photo

7/22/2014
Permalink

If you haven’t been able to get your hands on any of the new Tomb Raider comics so far, you’ll be happy to know that Dark Horse Comics will be publishing the first six issues as a trade paperback, Tomb Raider Volume 1: Season of the Witch, later this year.
Continue reading…

If you haven’t been able to get your hands on any of the new Tomb Raider comics so far, you’ll be happy to know that Dark Horse Comics will be publishing the first six issues as a trade paperback, Tomb Raider Volume 1: Season of the Witch, later this year.

Continue reading…

link

7/20/2014
Permalink

Stella, of Stella’s Tomb Raider Site fame, talks about her love for Tomb Raider and shares her thoughts on the franchise’s past, present, and future in our latest fan interview!

Continue reading “In the Spotlight: Stella”….

link

7/17/2014
Permalink

Long-time readers of The Archaeology of Tomb Raider will probably be familiar with my series, Lara’s Travels, which looks at the various real-life locations Ms Croft has visited over the years. Places which include Meteora, the Greek monastic complex which may have been the inspiration forTomb Raider 1′s St Francis’ Folly, and Jan Mayen, the icy, volcanic island which made an appearance in Tomb Raider: Underworld.

Lara’s globetrotting adventures have inspired many to follow in her footsteps and see these famous landmarks for themselves. And here are 5 bloggers who have done just that:

Continue reading “5 Bloggers Who Have Followed in Lara Croft’s Footsteps”…

photo

7/15/2014
Permalink

The Archaeology of Tomb Raider has been running a series of fan interviews over the past few months and has put over 30 fans from all around the world in the spotlight.
Our latest interviewee is Findlay G, a 15-year-old fan with a passion for Tomb Raider, computers, and technology.
You can find a full archive of fan interviews here!

The Archaeology of Tomb Raider has been running a series of fan interviews over the past few months and has put over 30 fans from all around the world in the spotlight.

Our latest interviewee is Findlay G, a 15-year-old fan with a passion for Tomb Raider, computers, and technology.

You can find a full archive of fan interviews here!

photo

7/14/2014
Permalink

Read my review of Mike Resnick’s novel, Tomb Raider: The Amulet of Power, over the Archaeology of Tomb Raider blog!

Read my review of Mike Resnick’s novel, Tomb Raider: The Amulet of Power, over the Archaeology of Tomb Raider blog!

photo

7/13/2014
Permalink

The metal inrō, one of the collectible items hidden throughout Tomb Raider 2013’s Shantytown section.
To learn more about the use and function of inrō in traditional Japanese culture, visit The Archaeology of Tomb Raider.

The metal inrō, one of the collectible items hidden throughout Tomb Raider 2013’s Shantytown section.

To learn more about the use and function of inrō in traditional Japanese culture, visit The Archaeology of Tomb Raider.

link

7/11/2014
Permalink

When I first played Tomb Raider 1 back in 1996, I never realized how many real-life Pre-Columbian (and other) artefacts could be spotted throughout the game’s Peru levels. Some of them, such as the Chimú bird carving, were already familiar to me as I had studied Peruvian art and archaeology for a GCSE art project. But it wasn’t until I started working on this blog and replaying this 1996 classic that I began to notice that the game’s graphics artists had also, perhaps unwittingly, incorporated Maya and Aztec motifs and artefacts in the design of their lost Inca city.**

One such example of a misplaced artefact is this statue depicting the Aztec maize goddess, Chicomecoatl, which can be found in one of the side chambers of Qualopec’s tomb.

Statue of Aztec maize goddess seen in Tomb Raider 1

Statue of Aztec maize goddess seen in Tomb Raider 1 (Image credit: Kelly M)

Continue reading “Arte-Factual: Tomb Raider 1: Aztec Maize Goddess”…
text

7/8/2014
Permalink

It’s All Greek to Me: Ancient Greek Art in the Tomb Raider Series

Since its launch in 2013, The Archaeology of Tomb Raider has published several articles on Ancient Greece and its art. If you’re interested in learning more about the Greek art and artefacts seen in the Tomb Raider games, feel free to check out the following!

*****************************************************

Ancient Greek Wrestlers

This scene of ancient Greek wrestlers can be found in Tomb Raider 1’s Colosseum level and is modelled on a funerary relief housed in Athen’s National Archaeological Museum. [Continue reading…]

*****************************************************

Athenian Owl Figurine

This beautiful artefact can be found in Tomb Raider: Anniversary and is based on a Proto-Corinthian aryballos (not an Athenian artefact as the name incorrectly suggests). [Continue reading…]

*****************************************************

Minoan Dolphin Fresco

Although not technically Greek, this well-known Minoan fresco was discovered at the Palace of Knossos in Crete and can be seen throughout the Greek levels of Tomb Raider 1. [Continue reading….]

*****************************************************

Mask of Tornarsuk

This fictional Inuit golden mask was actually modelled after the so-called “Mask of Agamemnon”, which was discovered at Mycenae, Greece, by Heinrich Schliemann. [Continue reading…]

*****************************************************

Lara’s Travels: Meteora

Tomb Raider 1’s St Francis’ Folly may be a fictional location but similar mountain-top monasteries can be found at Meteora in central Greece. [Continue reading…]

*****************************************************

Remember, folks, you can find many more articles on the art and archaeology of Tomb Raider over on the blog!

link

7/6/2014
Permalink

Over the past few months, I’ve had the opportunity to interview Tomb Raider fans and fan site owners from around the world and it never ceases to amaze me how this best-selling video game series has inspired so many from all walks of life.

You can find a complete list of interviews over at the Archaeology of Tomb Raider blog!

link

7/5/2014
Permalink